Quality pays off.

Well-made garments are getting harder to find and they’re always more expensive, but in the long term they’re almost always a better investment. Treehugger.com tells to look for signs of quality: thicker fabric with a better “hand,” tight weave and more precise sewing. Check the lining, the buttonholes and look for loose threads. Above all, choose a garment that you can wear with clothing you already love.

Chino alert.

Warm weather means chinos for most guys, dressed up with a white cotton shirt, dressed down with t-shirt or polo. Chinos come in colors way beyond khaki like classic blue, green, grey, brown and black. And there are a lot more colors in chinos than ever before (try Dockers).  For a crisp tailored look, let us clean and press your cotton trousers.  For home care, wash chinos inside out in warm water, avoid bleach and over-drying. Touch up wrinkles with a steam iron. Then hang on a trouser hanger, ready for wear.

Summer wedding tips for men.

Women have it easy with a simple non-white dress. In summer, a man’s traditional dark suit can be too warm, somber and predictable. For a city wedding, choose a lightweight suit in gray, blue or a subtle pattern. Style it up with a pastel Oxford or poplin shirt. In the country, blazers and sport coats reign, paired with well-cut chinos. Seaside or resort? A tailored white shirt, colored chinos and a light-colored linen blazer. Keep everything understated and appropriate for the venue. And always be ready with a clever toast.

Audrey Hepburn’s famous Burberry trench coat.

Christie’s London sale room will feature a collection of the beloved star’s clothing this fall.  Key fashion pieces include a Burberry trench coat, with an estimated price tag of $8,000-10,000, a selection of her ballet pumps and a blue satin cocktail dress by Hubert de Givenchy, one of Hepburn’s favorite designers. Of course, we can help care for heirlooms, collector’s items and couture.

Camp collars.

With bold prints and patterns, men’s camp collar shirts will be popular this summer with open-neck casual comfort, boxy fit and straight bottom hems. Tuck into chinos or wear oversized over a t-shirt for a youthful look, under a sports jacket for a more classic look. Valet magazine recommends classic camp collar shirts with wild prints and colors for the latest look.

Summer wedding tips.

A woman’s first rule: keep the spotlight on the bride by avoiding white, cream or pale pastels. Prints with light backgrounds are fine, as long as they don’t read as “white” from a distance. If the ceremony is in a house of worship, cover your shoulders with a sleeved dress or jacket. If the wedding’s outdoors, skip the heels and wear comfortable flats that won’t sink into the lawn. A fancier evening reception demands a cocktail dress or the classic little black dress. Beachside festivities are casual, time for a graphic sundress with a cardigan or short denim jacket for after dark. And don’t forget the sunscreen.

Men’s spring shopping.

Add a few new pieces to bring your wardrobe into style. Look for a bomber or army-style jacket to wear with lived-in jeans and a graphic t. This season’s relaxed-fit pants are far from baggy: legs are tapered, cropped or cuffed, there’s room in the seat and thighs. Lived-in jeans have rolled or frayed bottoms and may have a couple of holes, scrapes or shreds, authentic or factory-made.

The pocket square returns.

Whether you choose the classic, pesko, puff, crown or flower fold, your look in a blazer or suit jacket is always smarter with a pocket square. The splash of color and texture adds style and splash of personal expression. The quickest is a puff: lay the fabric flat, pick up the center, form a ring with thumb and index finger of other hand and slide down, fold over the pointed edges and tuck into your breast pocket.

Women in business, 2

Glamour magazine offers specific wardrobe tips for careers in retail, law and the arts. What’s in common? Choose an outfit that makes you feel comfortable and confident – and that’s appropriate for the work environment. A fitted silk blouse, skinny jeans and flats might fit into a techie environment, but always be sure you’re dressed to show that you take your new job seriously. Companies tend to hire people who fit best with the rest of the team.

Women in business, 1

Glamour magazine advises that how you dress for an interview can be as important as spell-checking your résumé. The obvious no-no’s: showing too much skin, wrinkles or stains, chipped manicure or scuffed footwear. Dress for the position and the industry, avoid loud patterns, large accessories and jewelry. Slim, tapered pants with a well-tailored blazer count as a power suit for most office positions. We’ll help make sure you’re looking your best.